Author Archives: andrewwhite921

What Will Go Wrong in 2018?

James Mackintosh of the Wall Street Journal posts in today’s US print edition on “The 3 Things That Can Go Awry in 2018“. The article details three dynamics that, if played out as he suggests, could cause the global economy to trip in 2018. His summaries are good and compelling and, given our amazingly positive outlook today as 2017 comes to a close with all major nations growing at roughly the same time (an odd occurrence in its own right), they come at a good time to consider conservative actions against possible shifts next year.

The three are:

  1. Monetary Tightening. The story here looks at Fed and central bank interest rate hikes. We all know that interest rate raises have started, at least in the UK and US, even though the EU remains firmly stuck taking that drug. Japan is taking it slow, even as its economy shows much signs of improved life – Japan will have to continue pushing rates up in 2018, just as the EU will have to follow the US’s lead. The problem with this item is that there are us a lot of debt out there – corporate debt, public debt and yes, some consumer debt. It is not the same kind of debt that was part of the run-up to the crash that put us where we are today, but for some firms and some governments its big risky debt. As an example, and tangentially related, another article in the WSJ reports on a few firms that are high in debt that will be financial impacted by Trump’s tax reform – see Tax Plan Downside for Dell, Others in Debt. A lot firms have issues debt in the last few years in response to QE and near zero interest rates. As rates increase, debt load and repayments will increase. If inflation were to join the party, it could be a messy time for a number of firms and governments.
  2. China. This story has been used before since China has been the source of two recent periods where the US stock market (in fact the global stock market) fell by about 10%. As such, China’s management of its economy – shifting from a producer-based to consumer-based economy – is a major challenge. Debt remains a problem, and capital controls and currency exchange rates just add more menu items for Chinese leadership to wrestle with. Should China sneeze, so the saying goes, we would all fall could of a cold or something worse. Worse, there is no coordination between east and west – so we are somewhat at the behest of the Fed and People’s Bank of China – and we all hope they do the right thing. Of course, they will both do the right thing for their own constituents – or try to. Hence the lack of cooperation.
  3. A Correlation Correction. This for me is the more interesting and most likely issue to blow up in 2018, and it is the least talked about in the press since it is not as well understood. Mr. Mackintosh states, “one reason investors hold bonds is to cushion losses in a stock-market downturn.” This approach has worked for quite a while, as prices have diverged short-term all the while converging over the long-term. The risk is that should inflation appear in 2018 the relationship between stocks and bonds may revert to how it was in the 1980s and early 1990s, with rising bond yields being bad for share prices. The problem for me is that I think inflation will rise in 2018 to just levels that this will be the catalyst for change in the markers. If you read the tea leaves, there is ample evidence of a change underway. Many commodity prices are doing very well. Copper prices are, as an example, reportedly at recent high’s due to increased production. If you look at producer prices in the US, they are inching up now over 3%. Even though wage pressures remain subdued, the pressure is building. Though participating rates for males in the US aged 25-54 are at near all-time lows, yes the employment rates seems low and may go lower, but there remains some slack to take up the growth we will see. But that pressure is there. I think that by the second half of the year, certainly by Q3, US inflation forecasts will show that 3.5-4% are on the horizon. This won’t cause a panic, but it will lead the change and correction that will come. On top of this the author suggests that the Fed may just “give in” to the needs to cap the bloated asset prices we see all around us, to nip the bubble before it becomes unsustainable. Trump’s tax deal will push this peak out a year or two, but the dynamics are in play.

Reading between the lines you can see that all three of the authors ideas overlap and intersect. Inflation is mentioned directly in 2 of the 3; growth is everywhere; public policy too. As such he has hedged his bets and tried to call out the category of challenge. I will try to break the triggers into more simplistic sections.

As such, I give the following percentage probability for each driving a correction by the end of 2018:

  1. Monetary Tightening, most likely US led, due to over heating: 15%
  2. China growth, debt to currency issues: 28%
  3. EU or euro-zone debt or banking crisis: 15%
  4. Inflation-driven policy changes: 22%
  5. Japan public debt or growth challenges: 10%
  6. Emerging Market currency or debt issues: 5% (this one won’t trigger in isolation but might follow from one of the others, namely 1, causing a currency drain)
  7. Significant War triggering financial panic: 5%

Trouble for The Eurozone with Trump’s Tax Deal

There was an excellent Opinion piece in today’s Wall Street Journal that calls out the less thought through implications of Trump’s domestic tax deal on international business. The piece, US Tax Reform Has Europe Worried, by Joseph C Sternberg, explores the writings of a German research group that details some thinking suggests some organizations will think twice about new investments in Europe – specifically Germany – with the new US corporate tax rates being leveled. The research piece is from ZEW and is here: Germany loses out in US Tax Reform. This is another dimension not modeled by US economists when they try to determine the impact of the tax reform on US growth.

The more important point however in Mr. Sternberg’s piece comes toward the end of his excellent article. The author suggests that US tax reform highlights a different opinion for taxation from an ideological perspective. This point needs to be talked about more since we have lost our Mojo for ideology in favor of a left-right populist dichotomy. The US reform is being used to alter tax incentives to drive growth, investment and job creation. Most of Europe, with is more socialist (and Democratic-leaning) policies, uses tax incentives mostly as a redistributive process for sharing an assumed pie. There is much less effort in driving growth or influencing investment to grow jobs. This is the dialog we had in the 1980s and it leads to the dialog about big government versus small government.

It is about time ideology got a fair crack again!

The Republican Tax Plan – Is it a Tax Cut Too Far?

I noted recently that economist cannot agree on the good, bad or ugliness of the medium to long term impact of near-zero interest rates or quantitive easing (QE). This suggests that economics is in a sad state of affairs. Even the Republican tax deal, winding its way through reconciliation this week, continues to create fervent grounds for disagreement. The most important sticking point concerns the rate of growth the tax changes might lead to. This is critical since it is the resulting change in GDP what will spin off excess profits and therefore taxes that will go to pay for the tax breaks. If GDP does not grow fast enough, insufficient funds will be created. If GDP excels, al will be well and the Democrats won’t be happy since they may lose the next general election.

In the Wall Street Journal on December 2-3 there was an interesting opinion piece by Phil Gramm and Michal Colon titled, Don’t Be Fooled by Secular Stagnation. Mr. Gramm is former chairman of the senate banking committee and now with the American Enterprise Institute. Mr Solon works for US Policy Metrics. The article compares America’s GDP averages over recent history and the assumptions that the Republicans are making with their forecasts. The two are not that far apart at all, yet other reports from different perspectives, using different assumptions, suggest growth will not reach its goals. The COB suggests growth might make 1.9% over 10 years; the Republican’s are looking for 2.6%. It turns out that since the end of WWII to 2008, America has averaged about 3.4% and this includes 10 recessions!

Then, when you get under the hood of the various models economist use you find the strangest of assumptions. The CBO’s model does not allow for any spin off of profits generated from growth to be plowed back into the economy to drive more growth. This the model is quite limited. Why don’t our economists or civil servants update their modes? Because it would be more political than economic. The CBO, as the article suggests, has been worn more times than it has been right with its GDP forecasts in the last 20 years. We might as well just ignore them and set up a new government department. At least that adds to employment which I am sure is irrefutable.

Financial Times’ Martin Wolf Finally Get’s it Right

In “Fix the Roof while the sun is shining“, on Wednesday December 6th, Martin Wolf reports on how excessive low interest rates and quantitive easing create conditions that lead to rampant and growing debt, and now this might hold our newly growing global economy back. No kidding. It is about time that Mr. Wolf caught up with the rest of us. QE and near-do rates have were useful in saving the economy, but after a very short period of time we should have pushed rates up and had the Fed (and other central banks) withdraw from QE. If we had any form of real global central bank collaboration, this could have been coordinated together and thus no single region would have been subject to any disruption. We don’t have any form of Bretton Woods 2.0 and so we were all left to figure this out alone.

Now the newly recoding and growing global economy is now dunk on debt. We have sovereign states, states, cities and the public sector that have stoked up on cheap money. Worse this cash has not been used to drive growth economy that would have spun off profits to feed the governments, such that recovery would have improved sooner. If your home is anything like mine, the State of Georgia has rebuilt roads that were perfectly good before; and not added valuable new roads or services. The private sector has been buying back shares to drive EPS to feed the bonus needs of executives; and been gorging on M&A activity that was not driven by weak firms failing but hostile acquisitions of reasonably performing assets. On top of this, in some regions of the world (see Italy as a good example), zombie banks and firms have been hogging underperforming assets in the interests of keeping employment going. Thus the Nannie state is alive and well, dressed up in a veneer of free market economics.

Much has been written since the financial crisis about how moribund the state of economics are. It seems we no longer have a core base of trusted economists guiding anyone, let alone our political leaders. The economists are almost as decided as the politicians are. Yet even in the most basic of areas, debt and credit, we have failed. How on earth unrelenting debt, massive imbalances, and market-inflicting Federal involvement in the bond market would be a good idea but for a fleeting while is beyond me. The blind were leading the blind. At least Mr. Wolf has removed his blind. Let’s hope the rest do – and soon.

One small picture says it all

Standing about 2-3 inches tell and 1-2 inches across, a small chart in page A6 of this last weekend’s Wall Street Journal, sums up our economic predicament. The article, Japan Firms End Yearslong Price Freezes, reports that a growing number of businesses are reporting that labor shortages and increasing demand are leading to price increases. The chart shows a pleasing, gradual but clear rise in prices in Japan over the last year, now approaching 1%. This is important.

Though 1% inflation sounds measly for Japan it could be a short-term boon. The nation has been bedeviled for over 20 years with meager growth, stagnant wages, and tepid productivity growth. In fact some economist suggest that Japan’s fall from economic grace that preceded the West’s financial crisis of 2007, demonstrated early what would happen in a deflationary economy with massive quantitative easing. QE did not drive Japan’s economy to growth; it does not seem to have done so in the west, though it may have saved it from crashing and now we see how it’s persistence has led to financial and investment dislocation.

The news all around us is quite positive:

  • Most recent quarterly GDP in US was restated up to 3.3%, almost unimaginable a year ago.
  • EU economic growth rates are forecasted to grow above their recent meager levels in recent OECD reports
  • ‘Currency war’ reports appear in the press infrequently, even though global trade remains torn by the idea that the US wants a stronger negotiating position (for what is, essentially, a very small part of the US economy).

But inflation remains stubbornly low almost everywhere. If Japan soon demonstrates ongoing growth in inflation, and global commodity prices push up, the result will be a wave of input price increase around the world. Some months later the US and more clearly the EU will see producer price increase and so consumers may see pass-through increases. This will encourage central banks to continue their march toward normality.

The downside with a return to inflation: Debt servicing becomes more onerous as interest rates increase in response to inflation increases. As such, governments and businesses that stocked up on cheap debt during QE and the near-zero interest rate period will have to squirrel away more cash to pay their interest charges. This will reduce what’s available for investment, thus slowing down growth.

The cycle feeds on itself so it can sometimes stabilize or other events can kick it into maddening swings. We will just have to see what happens. It may depend on how fast inflation growth returns. But for now, that little picture on page A6 looks very nice in a chilly autumn morning.

Regulating for Regulations’ Sake?

I read in today’s US print edition of the Wall Street Journal (see Change Proposed on Who Gets Tips) of a proposal to overturn a regulation concerning how tips are pooled that will impact restaurants, casinos and the like. Apparently under Obama’s reign, regulation was written that protected front-office staff from having to share tips with back-room staff. Now under Trump’s reign this regulation is being overturned and the industry may revert to the previous practice, that required tips to be shared with back-room staff.

I didn’t know such a regulation existed. Why does the federal government, or any government, regulate how tips are shared or pooled? Why is it not a decision for owner, manager and staff to work out? If it were left to local folks running the businesses, employees would flock to those businesses that offer the approach they appreciate the most.

This is a classic example of regulation for no other purpose than growing big government. We need to get Uncle Sam out of the kitchen and accounting office and back to running the armed forces.

Normalcy is Slowly Coming Back to our Economy

Love Trump or hate him, the one thing you have to say about the economy since around his election, it is starting to show signs of normality. That is, certain data suggest that firm behavior is slowly moving back toward what is more normally expected and widespread before the financial crisis.

Front page news in today’s US edition of the Wall Street Journal, “Firms cut buybacks as stocks become too expensive“, report that – as the title suggests, stock buybacks are falling again. This is a fall compared to recent record highs, so it is not that we are done with the mischievous side of Quantitative Easing. At a run rate of $500M spend by S&P 500 this year, 2017 will be fourth or fifth highest ever. The growth of which signaled that investors had noting better to do with their money then play with the earnings per share metric in order to pay out bonuses to executives. The negative to all this was the poorly performing capital investment side of the economy.

So here is where the other side of the story adds weight to the early sings of good behavior. The article continues on the inside front cover and there is a graph of capital expenditure. Running at near all time lows for a number of years, it is showing signs of increasing in 2017, This implies new plant, new equipment, new spend on IT and other productivity inducing and growth driving engines. This is what we want to see. It is not that our economy is well, really, it is just that it is a twisted monster. It is to a free market; it is a contorted, overly regulated morass of centrally guided actors. We need to get out from under QA and allow money and investment to find returns that are normal. If we were to couple this with the promised tax reform, we might unleash a new normal for 2018. Let’s see.